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Title: Collagen Ultrastructure and Skin Mechanics in DDR1 KO Mice
Extended abstract of a paper presented at Microscopy and Microanalysis 2013 in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, August 4 – August 8, 2013.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1201111
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10033099
Journal Name:
Microscopy and Microanalysis
Volume:
19
Issue:
S2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
110 to 111
ISSN:
1431-9276
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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