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Title: DEX: Query Execution in a Delta-based Storage System
The increasing reliance on robust data-driven decision-making across many domains has made it necessary for data management systems to manage many thousands to millions of versions of datasets, acquired or constructed at various stages of analysis pipelines over time. Delta encoding is an effective and widely-used solution to compactly store a large number of datasets, that simultaneously exploits redundancies across them and keeps the average retrieval cost of reconstructing any dataset low. However, supporting any kind of rich retrieval or querying functionality, beyond single dataset checkout, is challenging in such storage engines. In this paper, we initiate a systematic study of this problem, and present DEX, a novel stand-alone delta-oriented execution engine, whose goal is to take advantage of the already computed deltas between the datasets for efficient query processing. In this work, we study how to execute checkout, intersection, union and t-threshold queries over record-based files; we show that processing of even these basic queries leads to many new and unexplored challenges and trade-offs. Starting from a query plan that confines query execution to a small set of deltas, we introduce new transformation rules based on the algebraic properties of the deltas, that allow us to explore the search space of alternative plans. For the case of checkout, we present a dynamic programming algorithm to efficiently select the optimal query plan under our cost model, while we design efficient heuristics to select effective plans that vastly outperform the base checkout-then-query approach for other queries. A key characteristic of our query execution methods is that the computational cost is primarily dependent on the size and the number of deltas in the expression (typically small), and not the input dataset versions (which can be very large). We have implemented DEX prototype on top of git, a widely used version control system. We present an extensive experimental evaluation on synthetic data with diverse characteristics, that shows that our methods perform exceedingly well compared to the baseline.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1650755
NSF-PAR ID:
10041784
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2017 ACM International Conference on Management of Data (SIGMOD)
Page Range / eLocation ID:
171 to 186
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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