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Title: Timing of Deglacial AMOC Variability From a High-Resolution Seawater Cadmium Reconstruction: Timing Deglacial Upper AMOC Variability
NSF-PAR ID:
10046446
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.1029
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Paleoceanography
Volume:
32
Issue:
11
ISSN:
0883-8305
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1195 to 1203
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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