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Title: Transcriptome and phenotyping analyses support a role for chloroplast sigma factor 2 in red‐light‐dependent regulation of growth, stress, and photosynthesis
Abstract

Sigma factor (SIG) proteins contribute to promoter specificity of the plastid‐encodedRNApolymerase during chloroplast genome transcription. All six members of theSIGfamily, that is,SIG1–SIG6, are nuclear‐encoded proteins targeted to chloroplasts. Sigma factor 2 (SIG2) is a phytochrome‐regulated protein important for stoichiometric control of the expression of plastid‐ and nuclear‐encoded genes that impact plastid development and plant growth and development. AmongSIGfactors,SIG2 is required not only for transcription of chloroplast genes (i.e., anterograde signaling), but also impacts nuclear‐encoded, photosynthesis‐related, and light signaling‐related genes (i.e., retrograde signaling) in response to plastid functional status. AlthoughSIG2 is involved in photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis, the molecular bases for its role in light signaling that impacts photomorphogenesis and aspects of photosynthesis have only recently begun to be investigated. Previously, we reported thatSIG2 is necessary for phytochrome‐mediated photomorphogenesis specifically under red (R) and far‐red light, thereby suggesting a link between phytochromes and nuclear‐encodedSIG2 in light signaling. To explore transcriptional roles ofSIG2 in R‐dependent growth and development, we performedRNAsequencing analysis to compare gene expression insig2‐2mutant and Col‐0 wild‐type seedlings at two developmental stages (1‐ and 7‐day). We identified a subset of misregulated genes involved in growth, hormonal cross talk, stress responses, and photosynthesis. To investigate the functional relevance of these gene expression analyses, we performed several comparative phenotyping tests. In these analyses, strongsig2mutants showed insensitivity to bioactiveGA3, high intracellular levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) indicative of a stress response, and specific defects in photosynthesis, including elevated levels of cyclic electron flow (CEF) and nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). We demonstrated thatSIG2 regulates a broader range of physiological responses at the molecular level than previously reported, with specific roles in red‐light‐mediated photomorphogenesis.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10053869
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Plant Direct
Volume:
2
Issue:
2
ISSN:
2475-4455
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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  1. Premise

    Light is critical in the ability of plants to accumulate chlorophyll. When exposed to far‐red (FR) light and then grown in white light in the absence of sucrose, wild‐type seedlings fail to green in a response known as theFRblock of greening (BOG). This response is controlled by phytochrome A through repression of protochlorophyllide reductase‐encoding (POR) genes byFRlight coupled with irreversible plastid damage. Sigma (SIG) factors are nuclear‐encoded proteins that contribute to plant greening and plastid development through regulating gene transcription in chloroplasts and impacting retrograde signaling from the plastid to nucleus.SIGs are regulated by phytochromes, and the expression of someSIGfactors is reduced in phytochrome mutant lines, including phyA. Given the association of phyA with theFR BOGand its regulation ofSIGfactors, we investigated the potential regulatory role ofSIGfactors in theFR BOGresponse.

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    We examinedFR BOGresponses insigmutants, phytochrome‐deficient lines, and mutant lines for several phy‐associated factors. We quantified chlorophyll levels and examined expression of keyBOG‐associated genes.

    Results

    Among sixsigmutants, only thesig6 mutant significantly accumulated chlorophyll afterFR BOGtreatment, similar to thephyAmutant.SIG6 appears to control protochlorophyllide accumulation by contributing to the regulation of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis associated with glutamyl‐tRNAreductase (HEMA1) function, select phytochrome‐interacting factor genes (PIF4andPIF6), andPENTA1, which regulatesPORAmRNAtranslation afterFRexposure.

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    Regulation ofSIG6plays a significant role in plant responses toFRexposure during theBOGresponse.

     
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