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Title: Active Learning for Out-of-Class Activities by Using Interactive Mobile Apps
Keeping students engaged with the course content outside the classroom is a challenging task. Since learning during undergraduate years occurs not only as student engagement in class, but also during out-of-class activities, we need to redesign and reinvent such activities for this and future generation of students. Although active learning has been used widely to improve in-class student learning and engagement, its usage outside the classroom is not widespread and researched. Active learning is often not utilized for out-of-class activities and traditional unsupervised activities are used mostly to keep students engaged in the content after they leave the classroom. Although there has been tremendous research performed to improve student learning and engagement in the classroom, there are a few pieces of researches on improving out-of-class learning and student engagement. This poster will present an approach to redesign the traditional out-of-class activities with the help of mobile apps, which are interactive and adaptive, and will provide personalization to satisfy student's needs outside the classroom so that optimal learning experience can be achieved.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1712030
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10057677
Journal Name:
2018 International Conference on Learning and Teaching in Computing and Engineering (LaTICE)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
110 to 111
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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