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Title: A scalable nonlinear fluid–structure interaction solver based on a Schwarz preconditioner with isogeometric unstructured coarse spaces in 3D
Nonlinear fluid–structure interaction (FSI) problems on unstructured meshes in 3D appear in many applications in science and engineering, such as vibration analysis of aircrafts and patient-specific diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. In this work, we develop a highly scalable, parallel algorithmic and software framework for FSI problems consisting of a nonlinear fluid system and a nonlinear solid system, that are coupled monolithically.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1720366
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10057873
Journal Name:
Journal of computational physics
ISSN:
0021-9991
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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