skip to main content

Attention:

The NSF Public Access Repository (NSF-PAR) system and access will be unavailable from 11:00 PM ET on Thursday, June 13 until 2:00 AM ET on Friday, June 14 due to maintenance. We apologize for the inconvenience.


Title: A Sharp Error Analysis for the Fused Lasso, with Application to Approximate Changepoint Screening
In the 1-dimensional multiple changepoint detection problem, we derive a new fast error rate for the fused lasso estimator, under the assumption that the mean vector has a sparse number of changepoints. This rate is seen to be suboptimal (compared to the minimax rate) by only a factor of loglogn. Our proof technique is centered around a novel construction that we call a lower interpolant. We extend our results to misspecified models and exponential family distributions. We also describe the implications of our error analysis for the approximate screening of changepoints.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1712996
NSF-PAR ID:
10061394
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Advances in neural information processing systems
Volume:
30
ISSN:
1049-5258
Page Range / eLocation ID:
6884 - 6893
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. Abstract

    We propose the multiple changepoint isolation (MCI) method for detecting multiple changes in the mean and covariance of a functional process. We first introduce a pair of projections to represent the variability “between” and “within” the functional observations. We then present an augmented fused lasso procedure to split the projections into multiple regions robustly. These regions act to isolate each changepoint away from the others so that the powerful univariate CUSUM statistic can be applied region‐wise to identify the changepoints. Simulations show that our method accurately detects the number and locations of changepoints under many different scenarios. These include light and heavy tailed data, data with symmetric and skewed distributions, sparsely and densely sampled changepoints, and mean and covariance changes. We show that our method outperforms a recent multiple functional changepoint detector and several univariate changepoint detectors applied to our proposed projections. We also show that MCI is more robust than existing approaches and scales linearly with sample size. Finally, we demonstrate our method on a large time series of water vapor mixing ratio profiles from atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer measurements.

     
    more » « less
  2. null (Ed.)
    Online algorithms for detecting changepoints, or abrupt shifts in the behavior of a time series, are often deployed with limited resources, e.g., to edge computing settings such as mobile phones or industrial sensors. In these scenarios it may be beneficial to trade the cost of collecting an environmental measurement against the quality or "fidelity" of this measurement and how the measurement affects changepoint estimation. For instance, one might decide between inertial measurements or GPS to determine changepoints for motion. A Bayesian approach to changepoint detection is particularly appealing because we can represent our posterior uncertainty about changepoints and make active, cost-sensitive decisions about data fidelity to reduce this posterior uncertainty. Moreover, the total cost could be dramatically lowered through active fidelity switching, while remaining robust to changes in data distribution. We propose a multi-fidelity approach that makes cost-sensitive decisions about which data fidelity to collect based on maximizing information gain with respect to changepoints. We evaluate this framework on synthetic, video, and audio data and show that this information-based approach results in accurate predictions while reducing total cost. 
    more » « less
  3. Summary This paper deals with the detection and identification of changepoints among covariances of high-dimensional longitudinal data, where the number of features is greater than both the sample size and the number of repeated measurements. The proposed methods are applicable under general temporal-spatial dependence. A new test statistic is introduced for changepoint detection, and its asymptotic distribution is established. If a changepoint is detected, an estimate of the location is provided. The rate of convergence of the estimator is shown to depend on the data dimension, sample size, and signal-to-noise ratio. Binary segmentation is used to estimate the locations of possibly multiple changepoints, and the corresponding estimator is shown to be consistent under mild conditions. Simulation studies provide the empirical size and power of the proposed test and the accuracy of the changepoint estimator. An application to a time-course microarray dataset identifies gene sets with significant gene interaction changes over time. 
    more » « less
  4. Abstract

    In this paper, we consider sequentially estimating the density of univariate data. We utilize Pólya trees to develop a statistical process control (SPC) methodology. Our proposed methodology monitors the distribution of the sequentially observed data and detects when the generating density differs from an in‐control standard. We also propose an approximation that merges the probability mass of multiple possible changepoints to curb computational complexity while maintaining the accuracy of the monitoring procedure. We show in simulation experiments that our approach is capable of quickly detecting when a changepoint has occurred while controlling the number of false alarms, and performs well relative to competing methods. We then use our methodology to detect changepoints in high‐frequency foreign exchange (Forex) return data.

     
    more » « less
  5. Abstract

    Climate changepoint (homogenization) methods abound today, with a myriad of techniques existing in both the climate and statistics literature. Unfortunately, the appropriate changepoint technique to use remains unclear to many. Further complicating issues, changepoint conclusions are not robust to perturbations in assumptions; for example, allowing for a trend or correlation in the series can drastically change changepoint conclusions. This paper is a review of the topic, with an emphasis on illuminating the models and techniques that allow the scientist to make reliable conclusions. Pitfalls to avoid are demonstrated via actual applications. The discourse begins by narrating the salient statistical features of most climate time series. Thereafter, single- and multiple-changepoint problems are considered. Several pitfalls are discussed en route and good practices are recommended. While most of our applications involve temperatures, a sea ice series is also considered.

    Significance Statement

    This paper reviews the methods used to identify and analyze the changepoints in climate data, with a focus on helping scientists make reliable conclusions. The paper discusses common mistakes and pitfalls to avoid in changepoint analysis and provides recommendations for best practices. The paper also provides examples of how these methods have been applied to temperature and sea ice data. The main goal of the paper is to provide guidance on how to effectively identify the changepoints in climate time series and homogenize the series.

     
    more » « less