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Title: The microtubule-associated protein IQ67 DOMAIN5 modulates microtubule dynamics and pavement cell shape
Award ID(s):
1716972 1505848
NSF-PAR ID:
10063159
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Plant Physiology
ISSN:
0032-0889
Page Range / eLocation ID:
pp.00558.2018
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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