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Title: SedFoam-2.0: a 3-D two-phase flow numerical model for sediment transport

Abstract. In this paper, a three-dimensional two-phase flow solver, SedFoam-2.0, is presented for sediment transport applications. The solver is extended from twoPhaseEulerFoam available in the 2.1.0 release of the open-source CFD (computational fluid dynamics) toolbox OpenFOAM. In this approach the sediment phase is modeled as a continuum, and constitutive laws have to be prescribed for the sediment stresses. In the proposed solver, two different intergranular stress models are implemented: the kinetic theory of granular flows and the dense granular flow rheology μ(I). For the fluid stress, laminar or turbulent flow regimes can be simulated and three different turbulence models are available for sediment transport: a simple mixing length model (one-dimensional configuration only), a k − ε, and a k − ω model. The numerical implementation is demonstrated on four test cases: sedimentation of suspended particles, laminar bed load, sheet flow, and scour at an apron. These test cases illustrate the capabilities of SedFoam-2.0 to deal with complex turbulent sediment transport problems with different combinations of intergranular stress and turbulence models.

 
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Award ID(s):
1635151
NSF-PAR ID:
10073441
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Geoscientific Model Development
Volume:
10
Issue:
12
ISSN:
1991-9603
Page Range / eLocation ID:
4367 to 4392
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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