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Title: Structural Insight into Layered Silicon Hydrogen Phosphates Containing [SiO 6 ] Octahedra Prepared by Different Reaction Routes: Structural Insight into Layered Silicon Hydrogen Phosphates Containing [SiO 6 ] Octahedra Prepared by Different Reaction Routes
Award ID(s):
1634448
NSF-PAR ID:
10083787
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry
Volume:
2019
Issue:
6
ISSN:
1434-1948
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 828-836
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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