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Title: Hybrid Quantum-Classical Computing Architectures
We describe how classical supercomputing can aid unreliable quantum processors of intermediate size to solve large problem instances reliably. We advocate using a hybrid quantum-classical architecture where larger quantum circuits are broken into smaller sub-circuits that are evaluated separately, either using a quantum processor or a quantum simulator running on a classical supercomputer. Circuit compilation techniques that determine which qubits are simulated classically will greatly impact the system performance as well as provide a tradeoff between circuit reliability and runtime. We describe how classical supercomputing can aid unreliable quantum processors of intermediate size to solve large problem instances reliably. We advocate using a hybrid quantum-classical architecture where larger quantum circuits are broken into smaller sub-circuits that are evaluated separately, either using a quantum processor or a quantum simulator running on a classical supercomputer. Circuit compilation techniques that determine which qubits are simulated classically will greatly impact the system performance as well as provide a tradeoff between circuit reliability and runtime.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1730449
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10084839
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on Post-Moore Era Supercomputing, 2018.
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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