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Title: Climate change stimulated agricultural innovation and exchange across Asia
Ancient farmers experienced climate change at the local level through variations in the yields of their staple crops. However, archaeologists have had difficulty in determining where, when, and how changes in climate affected ancient farmers. We model how several key transitions in temperature affected the productivity of six grain crops across Eurasia. Cooling events between 3750 and 3000 cal. BP lead humans in parts of the Tibetan Plateau and in Central Asia to diversify their crops. A second event at 2000 cal. BP leads farmers in central China to also diversify their cropping systems and to develop systems that allowed transport of grains from southern to northern China. In other areas where crop returns fared even worse, humans reduced their risk by increasing investment in nomadic pastoralism and developing long-distance networks of trade. By translating changes in climatic variables into factors that mattered to ancient farmers, we situate the adaptive strategies they developed to deal with variance in crop returns in the context of environmental and climatic changes.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1632207 1745405 1637171
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10086419
Journal Name:
Science Advances
Volume:
4
Issue:
10
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
eaar4491
ISSN:
2375-2548
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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