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Title: Terrestrial isopods in urban environments: an overview
In an increasingly urbanized world scientific research has shifted towards the understanding of cities as unique ecosystems. Urban land use change results in rapid and drastic changes in physical and biological properties, including that of biodiversity and community composition. Soil biodiversity research often lags behind the more charismatic groups such as vertebrates and plants. This paper attempts to fill this gap and provides an overview on urban isopod research. First, a brief overview on urban land use change is given, specifically on the major alterations on surface soils. Historical studies on urban isopods is summarized, followed by the status of current knowledge on diversity, distribution, and function of urban isopod species and communities. A review of more than 100 publications revealed that worldwide 50 cities and towns have some record of terrestrial isopod species, but only a few of those are city-scale explorations of urban fauna. A total of 110 isopod species has been recorded although the majority of them only once. The ten most frequently occurring isopods are widely distributed synanthropic species. Knowledge gaps and future research needs call for a better global dataset, long term monitoring of urban populations, multi-scale analyses of landscape properties as potential drivers of more » isopod diversity, and molecular studies to detect evolutionary changes. « less
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1637661
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10086592
Journal Name:
ZooKeys
Volume:
801
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
97 to 126
ISSN:
1313-2989
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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