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Title: Performance Evaluation of Navigation Using LEO Satellite Signals with Periodically Transmitted Satellite Positions
Award ID(s):
1751205
NSF-PAR ID:
10088903
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The International Technical Meeting of the The Institute of Navigation
ISSN:
2330-3646
Page Range / eLocation ID:
306 to 318
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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