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Title: Contact Angle Dynamics during the Evaporation of Water from Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Graphene Surfaces
For this experimental study on evaporation of water from graphene, two graphene samples with different thickness and microstructure were used. Figure 1 shows the representative optical and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the two samples. Sample 1, shown in Figure 1a-b, is a 3 to 4 atomic layer of continuous graphene sheet grown on copper substrate via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and was subsequently transferred to a quartz substrate using a wet chemical method reported previously [5]. The graphene thickness is at 1.2 nm to 1.4 nm, as measured by Atomic Force Microscopy. Sample 2, shown in Figure 1c-d, represents an inkjet-printed reduced graphene oxide on silicon and subsequently treated with a direct pulsed laser writing (DPLW) process for surface 3D-nanostructuring. The layer thickness is between 6 µm and 7 µm.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1651451
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10091483
Journal Name:
http://mnf2018.me.gatech.edu/abstracts.php
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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