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Title: Towards a Layered and Secure Internet-of-Things Testbed via Hybrid Mesh
The Internet of Things (IoT) is an emerging technology that aims to connect our environment to the internet in the same way that personal computers connected people. As this technology progresses, the IoT paradigm becomes more prevalent in our everyday lives. The nature of IoT applications necessitates devices that are low-cost, power-sensitive, integrated, unobtrusive, and interoperable with existing cloud platforms and services, for example, Amazon AWS IoT, IBM Watson IoT. As a result, these devices are often small in size, with just enough computing power needed for their specific tasks. These resource-constrained devices are often unable to implement traditional network security measures and represent a vulnerability to network attackers as a result. Few frameworks are positioned to handle the influx of this new technology and the security concerns associated with it. Current solutions fail to provide a comprehensive and multi-layer solution to these inherent IoT security vulnerabilities. This paper presents a layered approach to IoT testbed that aims to bridge multiple connection standards and cloud platforms. To solve challenges surrounding this multi-layer IoT testbed, we propose a mesh inside a mesh IoT network architecture. Our designed "edge router" incorporates two mesh networks together and performs seamlessly transmission of multi-standard packets. The proposed IoT testbed interoperates with existing multi-standards (Wi-Fi, 6LoWPAN) and segments of networks, and provides both Internet and resilient sensor coverage to the cloud platform. To ensure confidentiality and authentication of IoT devices when interoperating with multiple service platforms, we propose optimized cryptographic techniques and software frameworks for IoT devices. We propose to extend and modify the existing open-source IDS platforms such as Snort to support IoT platforms and environments. We validate the efficacy of the proposed system by evaluating its performance and effect on key system resources. The work within this testbed design and implementation provides a solid foundation for further IoT system development.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1637371
NSF-PAR ID:
10092485
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2018 IEEE International Congress on Internet of Things (ICIOT)
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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