skip to main content

Attention:

The NSF Public Access Repository (NSF-PAR) system and access will be unavailable from 11:00 PM ET on Friday, July 12 until 2:00 AM ET on Saturday, July 13 due to maintenance. We apologize for the inconvenience.


Title: Genome Sequence of PM2-Like Phage Cr39582, Induced from a Pseudoalteromonas sp. Isolated from the Gut of Ciona robusta
ABSTRACT Phage Cr39582 was induced by mitomycin C from Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain Cr6751, isolated from a marine invertebrate gut. Pseudoalteromonas phage Cr39582 has 85% pairwise nucleotide identity with phage PM2 but lacks sequence homology in the spike protein. This report supports previous bioinformatic identification of corticoviral sequences within aquatic bacterial genomes.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1456301
NSF-PAR ID:
10093429
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Genome Announcements
Volume:
6
Issue:
21
ISSN:
2169-8287
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. Summary

    The production of pentabromopseudilin and related brominated compounds byPseudoalteromonasspp. has recently been linked to thebmpbiosynthetic gene cluster. This study explored the distribution and evolutionary history of this gene cluster in the genusPseudoalteromonas. A phylogeny of the genus revealed numerous clades that do not contain type strains, suggesting considerable species level diversity has yet to be described. Comparative genomics revealed four distinct versions of the gene cluster distributed among 19 of the 101Pseudoalteromonasgenomes examined. These were largely localized to the least inclusive clades containing thePseudoalteromonas luteoviolaceaandPseudoalteromonas phenolicatype strains and show clear evidence of gene and gene cluster loss in certain lineages.Bmpgene phylogeny is largely congruent with thePseudoalteromonasspecies phylogeny, suggesting vertical inheritance within the genus. However, the gene cluster is found in three different genomic environments suggesting either chromosomal rearrangement or multiple acquisition events.Bmpconservation within certain lineages suggests the encoded products are highly relevant to the ecology of these bacteria.

     
    more » « less
  2. Dudley, Edward G. (Ed.)
    ABSTRACT Bacteriophages (phages) are currently available for use by the food industry to control the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes . Although phage biocontrols are effective under specific conditions, their use can select for phage-resistant bacteria that repopulate phage-treated environments. Here, we performed short-term coevolution experiments to investigate the impact of single phages and a two-phage cocktail on the regrowth of phage-resistant L. monocytogenes and the adaptation of the phages to overcome this resistance. We used whole-genome sequencing to identify mutations in the target host that confer phage resistance and in the phages that alter host range. We found that infections with Listeria phages LP-048, LP-125, or a combination of both select for different populations of phage-resistant L. monocytogenes bacteria with different regrowth times. Phages isolated from the end of the coevolution experiments were found to have gained the ability to infect phage-resistant mutants of L. monocytogenes and L. monocytogenes strains previously found to be broadly resistant to phage infection. Phages isolated from coinfected cultures were identified as recombinants of LP-048 and LP-125. Interestingly, recombination events occurred twice independently in a locus encoding two proteins putatively involved in DNA binding. We show that short-term coevolution of phages and their hosts can be utilized to obtain mutant and recombinant phages with adapted host ranges. These laboratory-evolved phages may be useful for limiting the emergence of phage resistance and for targeting strains that show general resistance to wild-type (WT) phages. IMPORTANCE Listeria monocytogenes is a life-threatening bacterial foodborne pathogen that can persist in food processing facilities for years. Phages can be used to control L. monocytogenes in food production, but phage-resistant bacterial subpopulations can regrow in phage-treated environments. Coevolution experiments were conducted on a Listeria phage-host system to provide insight into the genetic variation that emerges in both the phage and bacterial host under reciprocal selective pressure. As expected, mutations were identified in both phage and host, but additionally, recombination events were shown to have repeatedly occurred between closely related phages that coinfected L. monocytogenes . This study demonstrates that in vitro evolution of phages can be utilized to expand the host range and improve the long-term efficacy of phage-based control of L. monocytogenes . This approach may also be applied to other phage-host systems for applications in biocontrol, detection, and phage therapy. 
    more » « less
  3. Roux, Simon (Ed.)
    ABSTRACT Chop, DelRio, and GrandSlam are phage with a Siphoviridae morphotype isolated from soil in Arkansas using the host Gordonia terrae 3612. All three are temperate, and their genomes share at least 96% nucleotide identity. These phage are assigned to cluster DI based on gene content similarity to other sequenced actinobacteriophage. 
    more » « less
  4. Abstract

    Bacteriophages play significant roles in the composition, diversity, and evolution of bacterial communities. Despite their importance, it remains unclear how phage diversity and phage-host interactions are spatially structured. Local adaptation may play a key role. Nitrogen-fixing symbiotic bacteria, known as rhizobia, have been shown to locally adapt to domesticated common bean at its Mesoamerican and Andean sites of origin. This may affect phage-rhizobium interactions. However, knowledge about the diversity and coevolution of phages with their respective Rhizobium populations is lacking. Here, through the study of four phage-Rhizobium communities in Mexico and Argentina, we show that both phage and host diversity is spatially structured. Cross-infection experiments demonstrated that phage infection rates were higher overall in sympatric rhizobia than in allopatric rhizobia except for one Argentinean community, indicating phage local adaptation and host maladaptation. Phage-host interactions were shaped by the genetic identity and geographic origin of both the phage and the host. The phages ranged from specialists to generalists, revealing a nested network of interactions. Our results suggest a key role of local adaptation to resident host bacterial communities in shaping the phage genetic and phenotypic composition, following a similar spatial pattern of diversity and coevolution to that in the host.

     
    more » « less
  5. Fe is a critical nutrient to the marine biological pump, which is the process that exports photosynthetically fixed carbon in the upper ocean to the deep ocean. Fe limitation controls photosynthetic activity in major regions of the oceans, and the subsequent degradation of exported photosynthetic material is facilitated particularly by marine heterotrophic bacteria. Despite their importance in the carbon cycle and the scarcity of Fe in seawater, the Fe requirements, storage and cytosolic utilization of these marine heterotrophs has been less studied. Here, we characterized the Fe metallome of Pseudoalteromonas (BB2-AT2). We found that with two copies of bacterioferritin (Bfr), Pseudoalteromonas possesses substantial capacity for luxury uptake of Fe. Fe : C in the whole cell metallome was estimated (assuming C : P stoichiometry ∼51 : 1) to be between ∼83 μmol : mol Fe : C, ∼11 fold higher than prior marine bacteria surveys. Under these replete conditions, other major cytosolic Fe-associated proteins were observed including superoxide dismutase (SodA; with other metal SOD isoforms absent under Fe replete conditions) and catalase (KatG) involved in reactive oxygen stress mitigation and aconitase (AcnB), succinate dehydrogenase (FrdB) and cytochromes (QcrA and Cyt1) involved in respiration. With the aid of singular value decomposition (SVD), we were able to computationally attribute peaks within the metallome to specific metalloprotein contributors. A putative Fe complex TonB transporter associated with the closely related Alteromonas bacterium was found to be abundant within the Pacific Ocean mesopelagic environment. Despite the extreme scarcity of Fe in seawater, the marine heterotroph Pseudoalteromonas has expansive Fe storage capacity and utilization strategies, implying that within detritus and sinking particles environments, there is significant opportunity for Fe acquisition. Together these results imply an evolved dedication of marine Pseudoalteromonas to maintaining an Fe metalloproteome, likely due to its dependence on Fe-based respiratory metabolism. 
    more » « less