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Title: Draft Genome Sequence of Nitrosomonas sp. Strain APG5, a Betaproteobacterial Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from Beach Sand
ABSTRACT Nitrosomonas sp. strain APG5 (=NCIMB 14870 = ATCC TSA-116) was isolated from dry beach sand collected from a supralittoral zone of the northwest coast of the United States. The draft genome sequence revealed that it represents a new species of the cluster 6 Nitrosomonas spp. that is closely related to Nitrosomonas ureae and Nitrosomonas oligotropha .
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1664052
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10093958
Journal Name:
Microbiology Resource Announcements
Volume:
8
Issue:
21
ISSN:
2576-098X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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