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Title: Evaluation of Virtual Reality Based Learning Materials as a Supplement to the Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Experience
Virtual reality offers vast possibilities to enhance the conventional approach for delivering engineering education. The introduction of virtual reality technology into teaching can improve the undergraduate mechanical engineering curriculum by supplementing the traditional learning experience with outside-the-classroom materials. The Center for Aviation and Automotive Technological Education using Virtual E-Schools (CA2VES), in collaboration with the Clemson University Center for Workforce Development (CUCWD), has developed a comprehensive virtual reality-based learning system. The available e-learning materials include eBooks, mini-video lectures, three-dimensional virtual reality technologies, and online assessments. Select VR-based materials were introduced to students in a sophomore level mechanical engineering laboratory course via fourteen online course modules during a four-semester period. To evaluate the material, a comparison of student performance with and without the material, along with instructor feedback, was completed. Feedback from the instructor and the teaching assistant revealed that the material was effective in improving the laboratory safety and boosted student’s confidence in handling engineering tools.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1700621
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10096489
Journal Name:
International journal of engineering education
Volume:
35
Issue:
3
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1-11
ISSN:
0949-149X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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