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Title: Large Volume Liquid State Scalar Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at High Magnetic Field
Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) can increase the sensitivity of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), but it is challenging in the liquid state at high magnetic fields. In this study we demonstrate significant enhancements of NMR signals (up to 70 on 13C) in the liquid state by scalar Overhauser DNP at 14.1 T, with high resolution (~0.1 ppm) and relatively large sample volume (~100 µL).
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1808660
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10099370
Journal Name:
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics
ISSN:
1463-9076
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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