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Title: Optical dipole trapping of Holmium
Neutral Holmium′s 128 ground hyperfine states, the most of any non-radioactive element, is a testbed for quantum control of a very high dimensional Hilbert space, and offers a promising platform for quantum computing. Its high magnetic moment also makes magnetic trapping a potentially viable alternative to optical trapping. Previously we have cooled Holmium atoms in a MOT on a 410.5 nm transition, characterized its Rydberg spectra, and made measurements of the dynamic scalar and tensor polarizabilities. We report here on progress towards narrow line cooling and magnetic trapping of single atoms.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1707854
NSF-PAR ID:
10100997
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
APS DAMOP meeting 2019
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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