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Title: Remote Telemanipulation with Adapting Viewpoints in Visually Complex Environments
In this paper, we introduce a novel method to support remote telemanipulation tasks in complex environments by providing operators with an enhanced view of the task environment. Our method features a novel viewpoint adjustment algorithm designed to automatically mitigate occlusions caused by workspace geometry, supports visual exploration to provide operators with situation awareness in the remote environment, and mediates context-specific visual challenges by making viewpoint adjustments based on sparse input from the user. Our method builds on the dynamic camera telemanipulation viewing paradigm, where a user controls a manipulation robot, and a camera-in-hand robot alongside the manipulation robot servos to provide a sufficient view of the remote environment. We discuss the real-time motion optimization formulation used to arbitrate the various objectives in our shared-control-based method, particularly highlighting how our occlusion avoidance and viewpoint adaptation approaches fit within this framework. We present results from an empirical evaluation of our proposed occlusion avoidance approach as well as a user study that compares our telemanipulation shared-control method against alternative telemanipulation approaches. We discuss the implications of our work for future shared-control research and robotics applications.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1830242
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10104548
Journal Name:
Robotics: Science and Systems XV
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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