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Title: A Methodology for Measuring FLOSS Ecosystems
FLOSS ecosystem as a whole is a critical component of world’s computing infrastructure, yet not well understood. In order to understand it well, we need to measure it first. We, therefore, aim to provide a framework for measuring key aspects of the entire FLOSS ecosystem. We first consider the FLOSS ecosystem through lens of a supply chain. The concept of supply chain is the existence of series of interconnected parties/affiliates each contributing unique elements and expertise so as to ensure a final solution is accessible to all interested parties. This perspective has been extremely successful in helping allowing companies to cope with multifaceted risks caused by the distributed decision-making in their supply chains, especially as they have become more global. Software ecosystems, similarly, represent distributed decisions in supply chains of code and author contributions, suggesting that relationships among projects, developers, and source code have to be measured. We then describe a massive measurement infrastructure involving discovery, extraction, cleaning, correction, and augmentation of publicly available open-source data from version control systems and other sources. We then illustrate how the key relationships among the nodes representing developers, projects, changes, and files can be accurately measured, how to handle absence of measures for more » user base in version control data, and, finally, illustrate how such measurement infrastructure can be used to increase knowledge resilience in FLOSS. « less
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1633437
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10106630
Journal Name:
Towards Engineering Free/Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) Ecosystems for Impact and Sustainability
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1-29
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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