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Title: Wide-area Software Defined Networking Experiments using Chameleon
Recent advancements have expanded Chameleon’s support for networking experiments by enabling deeply pro- grammable networks spanning wide-areas and controlled by the user. New capabilities include: 1) bring-your-own-controller (BYOC) software defined networking (SDN) and 2) Layer 2 stitching to external testbeds and facilities including stitching between the two Chameleon sites. This paper presents the new networking capabilities of Chameleon along with corresponding experiments that evaluate limitations and features of using SDN in a wide-area environment. The experiments serve both as an evaluation of SDN in a wide-area environment and as a guide for designing advanced networking experiments on Chameleon.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1743358
NSF-PAR ID:
10107103
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
IEEE Conference on Computer Communications workshops
ISSN:
2159-4228
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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