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Title: Managing Allocatable Resources
Infrastructure cloud computing allows its clients to allocate on-demand resources, typically consisting of a repre- sentation of a compute node. In general however, there is a need for allocating resources other than nodes and managing them in more controlled ways than simply on demand. This paper generalizes the familiar “compute power on demand” pattern by introducing the abstraction of an allocatable resource, describing its properties, and implementation for different types of resources. We further describe architecture for a generic allocatable resource management service that can be extended to manage diverse types of resources as well as the implementation of this architecture in the OpenStack Blazar service to manage resources ranging from bare-metal compute nodes to network segments. Finally, we provide a usage analysis of this service on the Chameleon testbed and use it to illustrate the effectiveness of resource management methods as well as the need for incentives in usage arbitration.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1743358
NSF-PAR ID:
10107201
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
IEEE ... International Conference on Cloud Computing
ISSN:
2159-6190
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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