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Title: Near-optimal Smooth Path Planning for Multisection Continuum Arms
We study the path planning problem for continuum-arm robots, in which we are given a starting and an end point, and we need to compute a path for the tip of the continuum arm between the two points. We consider both cases where obstacles are present and where they are not. We demonstrate how to leverage the continuum arm features to introduce a new model that enables a path planning approach based on the configurations graph, for a continuum arm consisting of three sections, each consisting of three muscle actuators. The algorithm we apply to the configurations graph allows us to exploit parallelism in the computation to obtain efficient implementation. We conducted extensive tests, and the obtained results show the completeness of the proposed algorithm under the considered discretizations, in both cases where obstacles are present and where they are not. We compared our approach to the standard inverse kinematics approach. While the inverse kinematics approach is much faster when successful, our algorithm always succeeds in finding a path or reporting that no path exists, compared to a roughly 70% success rate of the inverse kinematics approach (when a path exists).
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1718755
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10109162
Journal Name:
2019 2nd IEEE International Conference on Soft Robotics (RoboSoft)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
416 to 421
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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