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Title: Multiphase flow distribution in mql drilling using optical intensity distribution based approach
Oil flow distribution in Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) plays an important role in the efficiency of machining processes, but it remains challenging to measure experimentally. This paper presents a new method to measure the oil flow distribution in through-channel drill bits based on the reflected light intensity. Measurements were conducted from multiple angles in order to map the flow distribution across the channel cross-sectional area. The method is applied to drill bits of a circular cross-section channel and two helix angles, 0° and 30°. The results show that, for the 0° helix angle channel, the oil concentrates near the periphery of the channel, while for 30° helix angle channel, the oil concentrates towards the center of the drill point. Furthermore, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation was conducted to compare with the measurement results, and it was observed that the oil distribution is correlated to the velocity field. Oil flow concentration is high in low velocity regions. Though preliminary, this study has concluded that the velocity field generated using single-phase CFD is a critical indicator for oil distribution in an MQL flow.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1760985
NSF-PAR ID:
10109302
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Manufacturing science and engineering
ISSN:
1096-6668
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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