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Title: Two Cheers for Air Pollution Control: Triumphs and Limits of the Mid-Century Fight for Air Quality
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1827951
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10110582
Journal Name:
Public Health Reports
Volume:
134
Issue:
3
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
307 to 312
ISSN:
0033-3549
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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