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Title: Using Surface Brightness Fluctuations to Study nearby Satellite Galaxy Systems: The Complete Satellite System of M101
Award ID(s):
1713828
NSF-PAR ID:
10112643
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
878
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2041-8213
Page Range / eLocation ID:
L16
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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