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Title: Community Report on Digitally-Mediated Team Learning
The purpose of the Digitally-Mediated Team Learning Workshop (sponsored by the National Science Foundation through a Dear Colleague Letter [NSF 18-017] via grant 1825007) was to ascertain the current state of the field and future research approaches for DMTL delivered through synchronous modalities in STEM classrooms for students in upper elementary grades through college. The overarching question for the workshop was: “How can we advance effective and scalable digital environments for synchronous team-based learning involving problem-solving and design activities within STEM classrooms for all learners?” The workshop explored the state of the field and future directions of DMTL through its four tracks: (a) student-facing and instructor-facing tools, (b) learning analytics, (c) pedagogical and andragogical strategies, and (d) inclusivity.
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1825007
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10113046
Journal Name:
Rapid Community Report
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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