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Title: Assessing the stability of Tweet corpora for hurricane events over time: A mixed methods approach
When natural disasters occur, various organizations and agencies turn to social media to understand who needs help and how they have been affected. The purpose of this study is twofold: first, to evaluate whether hurricane-related tweets have some consistency over time, and second, whether Twitter-derived content is thematically similar to other private social media data. Through a unique method of using Twitter data gathered from six different hurricanes, alongside private data collected from qualitative interviews conducted in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, we hypothesize that there is some level of stability across hurricane-related tweet content over time that could be used for better real-time processing of social media data during natural disasters. We use latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) to derive topics, and, using Hellinger distance as a metric, find that there is a detectable connection among hurricane topics. By uncovering some persistent thematic areas and topics in disaster-related tweets, we hope these findings can help first responders and government agencies discover urgent content in tweets more quickly and reduce the amount of human intervention needed.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1760453
NSF-PAR ID:
10120492
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Social media + society
ISSN:
2056-3051
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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