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Title: Mechanisms Governing Interannual Variability of Stratosphere-to-Troposphere Ozone Transport: MECHANISMS OF OZONE TRANSPORT
Award ID(s):
1756958 1643167
NSF-PAR ID:
10125447
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
Volume:
123
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2169-897X
Page Range / eLocation ID:
234 to 260
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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