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Title: The Evolutions and Large‐Scale Mechanisms of Summer Stratospheric Ozone Intrusion Across Global Hotspots
Abstract

Stratospheric ozone intrusions can have a significant impact on regional near‐surface ozone levels. Especially in summer, intrusions can contribute to extreme ozone events because of preexisting high ozone levels near the surface and cause serious health issues. Considering the increasing trend of surface ozone level, an understanding of stratospheric ozone intrusion is necessary. From a 19‐year Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model, version 6 simulation and a stratospheric origin ozone tracer, we identify the global hotspots of stratospheric intrusions based on extreme tracer concentrations near the surface: North America, Africa, the Mediterranean, and the Middle East. We investigate the common underlying large‐scale mechanisms of the stratospheric intrusions over the identified hotspots from the lower stratosphere to the lower troposphere. From the trajectory analysis, we find that the upper‐level jet drives isentropic mixing near the jet axis and initiates stratospheric ozone intrusion. Subsequently, climatological descent at the lower troposphere brings the ozone down to the surface, which explains the spatial preference of summertime stratospheric intrusion events.

 
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Award ID(s):
1802248
NSF-PAR ID:
10493671
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.1029
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
Volume:
129
Issue:
4
ISSN:
2169-897X
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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