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Title: VSI: Edu*-2016 - Keeping up with technology: Teaching Parallel, Distributed and High-Performance Computing
This special issue is devoted to progress in one of the most important challenges facing computing education.The work published here is of relevance to those who teach computing related topics at all levels, with greatest implications for undergraduate education. Parallel and distributed computing (PDC) has become ubiquitous to the extent that even casual users feel their impact. This necessitates that every programmer understands how parallelism and a distributed environment affect problem solving. Thus,teaching only traditional, sequential programming is no longer adequate. For this reason, it is essential to impart a range of PDC and high performance computing (HPC) knowledge and skills at various levels within the educational fabric woven by Computer Science (CS), Computer Engineering (CE), and related computational science and engineering curricula. This special issue sought high quality contributions in the fields of PDC and HPC education. Submissions were on the topics of EduPar2016, Euro-EduPar2016 and EduHPC2016 workshops,but the submission was open to all. This special issue includes 12 paper spanning pedagogical techniques, tools and experiences.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1727395
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10127598
Journal Name:
Journal of parallel and distributed computing
Volume:
118
Issue:
1
ISSN:
0743-7315
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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