skip to main content

Title: IUIoT: intelligent user interfaces for IoT
As IoT devices begin to permeate our environment, our interaction with these devices are starting to have a real potential to transform our daily lives. Therefore, there exists an incredible opportunity for intelligent user interfaces to simplify the task of controlling such devices. The goal of IUIoT workshop was to serve as a platform for researchers who are working towards the design of IoT systems from an intelligent, human-centered perspective. The workshop accepted a total of five papers: two position and three extended abstracts. These papers were presented by the authors and discussed among the workshop attendees with an aim of exploring future directions and improving existing approaches towards designing intelligent User Interfaces for IoT environments.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1640664
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10127963
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces: Companio
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
139 - 140
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. Smart devices and Internet of Things (IoT) technologies are replacing or being incorporated into traditional devices at a growing pace. The use of digital interfaces to interact with these devices has become a common occurrence in homes, work spaces, and various industries around the world. The most common interfaces for these connected devices focus on mobile apps or voice control via intelligent virtual assistants. However, with augmented reality (AR) becoming more popular and accessible among consumers, there are new opportunities for spatial user interfaces to seamlessly bridge the gap between digital and physical affordances. In this paper, we present a human-subject study evaluating and comparing four user interfaces for smart connected environments: gaze input, hand gestures, voice input, and a mobile app. We assessed participants’ user experience, usability, task load, completion time, and preferences. Our results show multiple trade-offs between these interfaces across these measures. In particular, we found that gaze input shows great potential for future use cases, while both gaze input and hand gestures suffer from limited familiarity among users, compared to voice input and mobile apps.
  2. Smart devices and Internet of Things (IoT) technologies are replacing or being incorporated into traditional devices at a growing pace. The use of digital interfaces to interact with these devices has become a common occurrence in homes, work spaces, and various industries around the world. The most common interfaces for these connected devices focus on mobile apps or voice control via intelligent virtual assistants. However, with augmented reality (AR) becoming more popular and accessible among consumers, there are new opportunities for spatial user interfaces to seamlessly bridge the gap between digital and physical affordances. In this paper, we present a human-subject study evaluating and comparing four user interfaces for smart connected environments: gaze input, hand gestures, voice input, and a mobile app. We assessed participants’ user experience, usability, task load, completion time, and preferences. Our results show multiple trade-offs between these interfaces across these measures. In particular, we found that gaze input shows great potential for future use cases, while both gaze input and hand gestures suffer from limited familiarity among users, compared to voice input and mobile apps.
  3. When transferring sensitive data to a non-trusted party, end-users require that the data be kept private. Mobile and IoT application developers want to leverage the sensitive data to provide better user experience and intelligent services. Unfortunately, existing programming abstractions make it impossible to reconcile these two seemingly conflicting objectives. In this paper, we present a novel programming mechanism for distributed managed execution environments that hides sensitive user data, while enabling developers to build powerful and intelligent applications, driven by the properties of the sensitive data. Specifically, the sensitive data is never revealed to clients, being protected by the runtime system. Our abstractions provide declarative and configurable data query interfaces, enforced by a lightweight distributed runtime system. Developers define when and how clients can query the sensitive data’s properties (i.e., how long the data remains accessible, how many times its properties can be queried, which data query methods apply, etc.). Based on our evaluation, we argue that integrating our novel mechanism with the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) can address some of the most pertinent privacy problems of IoT and mobile applications.
  4. Despite the phenomenal advances in the computational power and functionality of electronic systems, human-machine interaction has largely been limited to simple control panels, keyboard, mouse and display. Consequently, these systems either rely critically on close human guidance or operate almost independently from the user. An exemplar technology integrated tightly into our lives is the smartphone. However, the term “smart” is a misnomer, since it has fundamentally no intelligence to understand its user. The users still have to type, touch or speak (to some extent) to express their intentions in a form accessible to the phone. Hence, intelligent decision making is still almost entirely a human task. A life-changing experience can be achieved by transforming machines from passive tools to agents capable of understanding human physiology and what their user wants [1]. This can advance human capabilities in unimagined ways by building a symbiotic relationship to solve real world problems cooperatively. One of the high-impact application areas of this approach is assistive internet of things (IoT) technologies for physically challenged individuals. The Annual World Report on Disability reveals that 15% of the world population lives with disability, while 110 to 190 million of these people have difficulty in functioning [1]. Qualitymore »of life for this population can improve significantly if we can provide accessibility to smart devices, which provide sensory inputs and assist with everyday tasks. This work demonstrates that smart IoT devices open up the possibility to alleviate the burden on the user by equipping everyday objects, such as a wheelchair, with decision-making capabilities. Moving part of the intelligent decision making to smart IoT objects requires a robust mechanism for human-machine communication (HMC). To address this challenge, we present examples of multimodal HMC mechanisms, where the modalities are electroencephalogram (EEG), speech commands, and motion sensing. We also introduce an IoT co-simulation framework developed using a network simulator (OMNeT++) and a robot simulation platform Virtual Robot Experimentation Platform (V-REP). We show how this framework is used to evaluate the effectiveness of different HMC strategies using automated indoor navigation as a driver application.« less
  5. The proliferation of the Internet of Things (IoT) has started transforming our lifestyle through automation of home appliances. However, there are users who are hesitant to adopt IoT devices due to various privacy and security concerns. In this paper, we elicit peoples’ attitude and concerns towards adopting IoT devices. We conduct an online survey and collect responses from 232 participants from three different geographic regions (United States, Europe, and India); the participants consist of both adopters and non-adopters of IoT devices. Through data analysis, we determine that there are both similarities and differences in perceptions and concerns between adopters and non-adopters. For example, even though IoT and non-IoT users share similar security and privacy concerns, IoT users are more comfortable using IoT devices in private settings compared to non-IoT users. Furthermore, when comparing users’ attitude and concerns across different geographic regions, we found similarities between participants from the US and Europe, yet participants from India showcased contrasting behavior. For instance, we found that participants from India were more trusting in their government to properly protect consumer data and were more comfortable using IoT devices in a variety of public settings, compared to participants from the US and Europe. Based onmore »our findings, we provide recommendations to reduce users’ concerns in adopting IoT devices, and thereby enhance user trust towards adopting IoT devices.« less