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Title: A Predictive Analytics Approach for Nursing Home Hurricane Evacuation
Whether to evacuate a nursing home (NH) or shelter in place in response to the approaching hurricane is one of the most complex and difficult decisions encountered by nursing home administrators. A variety of factors may affect the evacuation decision, including storm and environmental conditions, nursing home characteristics, and the dwelling residents’ health conditions. Successful prediction of evacuation decision is essential to proactively prepare and manage resources to meet the surge in nursing home evacuation demands. In current nursing home emergency preparedness literature, there is a lack of analytical models and studies for nursing home evacuation demand prediction. In this paper, we propose a predictive analytics framework by applying machine learning techniques, integrated with domain knowledge in NH evacuation research, to extract, identify and quantify the effects of relevant factors on NH evacuation from heterogeneous data sources. In particular, storm features are extracted from Geographic Information System (GIS) data to strengthen the prediction accuracy. To further illustrate the proposed work and demonstrate its practical validity, a real-world case study is given to investigate nursing home evacuation in response to recent Hurricane Irma in Florida. The prediction performance among different predictive models are also compared comprehensively.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1825725
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10129144
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 2019 IISE Annual Conference
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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