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Title: Level Design Patterns in 2D Games
Videogame designers use tips and tricks and tools of the trade to design levels. Some of these tips are based on their gut feeling and others have been known in the game industry for the last 30 years. In this work, we discuss six of common level design patterns present in 2D videogames. The patterns under discussion are the product of an exploratory analysis of over thirty 2D games. We choose to focus on patterns that are both common and impactful for the overall player experience. We discuss in detail the rationale for and advantages of each pattern, showing examples of games that make use of such. We conclude with a discussion of the usage and understanding of these patterns from the perspective of level design and how other technical approaches can benefit from them.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1717324
NSF-PAR ID:
10132604
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2019 IEEE Conference on Games (CoG)
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 8
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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