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Title: Deterministic and stochastic control of kirigami topology

Kirigami, the creative art of paper cutting, is a promising paradigm for mechanical metamaterials. However, to make kirigami-inspired structures a reality requires controlling the topology of kirigami to achieve connectivity and rigidity. We address this question by deriving the maximum number of cuts (minimum number of links) that still allow us to preserve global rigidity and connectivity of the kirigami. A deterministic hierarchical construction method yields an efficient topological way to control both the number of connected pieces and the total degrees of freedom. A statistical approach to the control of rigidity and connectivity in kirigami with random cuts complements the deterministic pathway, and shows that both the number of connected pieces and the degrees of freedom show percolation transitions as a function of the density of cuts (links). Together, this provides a general framework for the control of rigidity and connectivity in planar kirigami.

Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1764269
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10134600
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Volume:
117
Issue:
9
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
p. 4511-4517
ISSN:
0027-8424
Publisher:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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