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Title: Structural Chemistry of Akdalaite, Al10O14(OH)2, the Isostructural Aluminum Analogue of Ferrihydrite
As part of an effort to characterize clusters and intermediate phases likely to be encountered along solution reaction pathways that produce iron and aluminum oxide-hydroxides from Fe and Al precursors, the complete structure of Al10O14(OH)2 (akdalaite) was determined from a combination of single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SC-XRD) data collected at 100 K to define the Al and O positions, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and neutron powder diffraction (NPD) data collected at room temperature (~300 K) to precisely determine the nature of hydrogen in the structure. Two different synthesis routes produced different crystal morphologies. Using an aluminum oxyhydroxide floc made from mixing AlCl3 and 0.48 M NaOH, the product had uniform needle morphology, while using nanocrystalline boehmite (Vista Chemical Company Catapal D alumina) as the starting material produced hexagonal plates. Akdalaite crystallizes in the space group P63mc with lattice parameters of a = 5.6244(3) Å and c = 8.8417(3) Å (SC-XRD) and a = 5.57610(2) Å and c = 8.77247(6) Å (NPD). The crystal structure features Al13O40 Keggin clusters. The structural chemistry of akdalaite is nonideal but broadly conforms to that of ferrihydrite, the nanomineral with which it is isostructural.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1834750
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10135094
Journal Name:
Crystals
Volume:
9
Issue:
5
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
246
ISSN:
2073-4352
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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