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Title: Single step Production of graphite from organic Samples for Radiocarbon Measurements
Abstract We present a new low-cost, high-throughput method for converting many types of organic carbon samples into graphite for radiocarbon ( 14 C) measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The method combines sample combustion and reduction to graphite into a single procedure. In the Single Step method, solid samples are placed directly into Pyrex containing zinc, titanium hydride and iron catalyst. The tube is evacuated, flame sealed, and placed in a muffle furnace for 7 hr. A variety of organic samples have been tested including oxalic acid, sucrose, wood, peat, collagen, humic acid, and contamination swipe samples. The method significantly reduces the time required to produce a graphite sample for 14 C measurement, with analytical precision and accuracy approaching that of traditional two-step combustion and hydrogen reduction methods. The details and applicability of the method are presented.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1755125
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10136015
Journal Name:
Radiocarbon
Volume:
61
Issue:
6
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1843 to 1854
ISSN:
0033-8222
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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