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Title: High-performance all-solid-state batteries enabled by salt bonding to perovskite in poly(ethylene oxide)
Flexible and low-cost poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-based electrolytes are promising for all-solid-state Li-metal batteries because of their compatibility with a metallic lithium anode. However, the low room-temperature Li-ion conductivity of PEO solid electrolytes and severe lithium-dendrite growth limit their application in high-energy Li-metal batteries. Here we prepared a PEO/perovskite Li 3/8 Sr 7/16 Ta 3/4 Zr 1/4 O 3 composite electrolyte with a Li-ion conductivity of 5.4 × 10 −5 and 3.5 × 10 −4 S cm −1 at 25 and 45 °C, respectively; the strong interaction between the F − of TFSI − (bis-trifluoromethanesulfonimide) and the surface Ta 5+ of the perovskite improves the Li-ion transport at the PEO/perovskite interface. A symmetric Li/composite electrolyte/Li cell shows an excellent cyclability at a high current density up to 0.6 mA cm −2 . A solid electrolyte interphase layer formed in situ between the metallic lithium anode and the composite electrolyte suppresses lithium-dendrite formation and growth. All-solid-state Li|LiFePO 4 and high-voltage Li|LiNi 0.8 Mn 0.1 Co 0.1 O 2 batteries with the composite electrolyte have an impressive performance with high Coulombic efficiencies, small overpotentials, and good cycling stability.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1808517
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10136453
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Volume:
116
Issue:
38
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
18815 to 18821
ISSN:
0027-8424
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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