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Title: A Study of Pore Formation During Single Layer and Multiple Layer Build by Selective Laser Melting
In this study, different hatch spacings were used to fabricate single layer and multiple layers, and its effect on porosity was investigated by using microcomputed tomography. The combination of laser power (100 W, 150 W, 175 W, and 195W) and scan speeds (600 mm/s, 800 mm/s, 1000 mm/s and 1200 mm/s) which resulted in the least number of pores were selected from the previous single-track experiment. Six levels of hatch spacings were selected based on the track width to form single and multiple layers: 60%, 70%, 80%, 90%, 120% and 150% of track widths. For the multilayer build, the variation in keyhole porosity within the given window of parameters were found to be attributed to the variation in the hatch spacing. In general, the pore number decreased with increase in hatch spacing from 60% to 90% but increased when hatch spacing further increased from 90% to 120%.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1662662
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10140437
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 30th Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium
Volume:
30
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
522-532
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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