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Title: Universal logical gates with constant overhead: instantaneous Dehn twists for hyperbolic quantum codes
A basic question in the theory of fault-tolerant quantum computation is to understand the fundamental resource costs for performing a universal logical set of gates on encoded qubits to arbitrary accuracy. Here we consider qubits encoded with constant space overhead (i.e. finite encoding rate) in the limit of arbitrarily large code distance d through the use of topological codes associated to triangulations of hyperbolic surfaces. We introduce explicit protocols to demonstrate how Dehn twists of the hyperbolic surface can be implemented on the code through constant depth unitary circuits, without increasing the space overhead. The circuit for a given Dehn twist consists of a permutation of physical qubits, followed by a constant depth local unitary circuit, where locality here is defined with respect to a hyperbolic metric that defines the code. Applying our results to the hyperbolic Fibonacci Turaev-Viro code implies the possibility of applying universal logical gate sets on encoded qubits through constant depth unitary circuits and with constant space overhead. Our circuits are inherently protected from errors as they map local operators to local operators while changing the size of their support by at most a constant factor; in the presence of noisy syndrome measurements, our results suggest the possibility of universal fault tolerant quantum computation with constant space overhead and time overhead of O ( d / log ⁡ d ) . For quantum circuits that allow parallel gate operations, this yields the optimal scaling of space-time overhead known to date.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1753240
NSF-PAR ID:
10146601
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Quantum
Volume:
3
ISSN:
2521-327X
Page Range / eLocation ID:
180
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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