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Title: Capture the Feature Flag: Detecting Feature Flags in Open-Source
Award ID(s):
1717415 1813598 1552944
NSF-PAR ID:
10157115
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
International Conference on Mining Software Repositories
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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