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Title: Polymyxin derivatives as broad-spectrum antibiotic agents
We designed a few polymyxin derivatives which exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. Lead compound P1 could disrupt bacterial membranes rapidly without developing resistance, inhibit biofilms formed by E. coli , and exhibit excellent in vivo activity in an MRSA-infected thigh burden mouse model.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1708500
NSF-PAR ID:
10158148
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Chemical Communications
Volume:
55
Issue:
87
ISSN:
1359-7345
Page Range / eLocation ID:
13104 to 13107
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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