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Title: Mapping Structural Dynamics of Proteins with Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy
The structure–function relationships of biomolecules have captured the interest and imagination of the scientific community and general public since the field of structural biology emerged to enable the molecular understanding of life processes. Proteins that play numerous functional roles in cellular processes have remained in the forefront of research, inspiring new characterization techniques. In this review, we present key theoretical concepts and recent experimental strategies using femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) to map the structural dynamics of proteins, highlighting the flexible chromophores on ultrafast timescales. In particular, wavelength-tunable FSRS exploits dynamic resonance conditions to track transient-species-dependent vibrational motions, enabling rational design to alter functions. Various ways of capturing excited-state chromophore structural snapshots in the time and/or frequency domains are discussed. Continuous development of experimental methodologies, synergistic correlation with theoretical modeling, and the expansion to other nonequilibrium, photoswitchable, and controllable protein systems will greatly advance the chemical, physical, and biological sciences.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1455353
NSF-PAR ID:
10159263
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Annual Review of Physical Chemistry
Volume:
71
Issue:
1
ISSN:
0066-426X
Page Range / eLocation ID:
239 to 265
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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