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Title: Finding the Needle in the Haystack with Convolutions: on the benefits of architectural bias
Despite the phenomenal success of deep neural networks in a broad range of learning tasks, there is a lack of theory to understand the way they work. In particular, Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) are known to perform much better than Fully-Connected Networks (FCNs) on spatially structured data: the architectural structure of CNNs benefits from prior knowledge on the features of the data, for instance their translation invariance. The aim of this work is to understand this fact through the lens of dynamics in the loss landscape. We introduce a method that maps a CNN to its equivalent FCN (denoted as eFCN). Such an embedding enables the comparison of CNN and FCN training dynamics directly in the FCN space. We use this method to test a new training protocol, which consists in training a CNN, embedding it to FCN space at a certain relax time'', then resuming the training in FCN space. We observe that for all relax times, the deviation from the CNN subspace is small, and the final performance reached by the eFCN is higher than that reachable by a standard FCN of same architecture. More surprisingly, for some intermediate relax times, the eFCN outperforms the CNN it stemmed, by combining the prior information of the CNN and the expressivity of the FCN in a complementary way. The practical interest of our protocol is limited by the very large size of the highly sparse eFCN. However, it offers interesting insights into the persistence of architectural bias under stochastic gradient dynamics. It shows the existence of some rare basins in the FCN loss landscape associated with very good generalization. These can only be accessed thanks to the CNN prior, which helps navigate the landscape during the early stages of optimization.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1845360 1816753
NSF-PAR ID:
10159684
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Advances in neural information processing systems
ISSN:
1049-5258
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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