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Title: Investigating the Effect of Microbial Activity and Chemical Concentrations on the Mineralogy and Morphology of Ureolytic Bio-Cementation
Numerous laboratory studies in the past decade have demonstrated the ability of microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP), a bio-mediated soil improvement method, to favorably transform a soil’s engineering properties including increased shear strength and stiffness with reductions in hydraulic conductivity and porosity. Despite significant advances in treatment application techniques and characterization of post-treatment engineering properties, relationships between biogeochemical conditions during precipitation and post-treatment material properties have remained poorly understood. Bacterial augmentation, stimulation, and cementation treatments can vary dramatically in their chemical constituents, concentrations, and ratios between researchers, with specific formulas oftentimes perpetuating despite limited understanding of their engineering implications. In this study, small-scale batch experiments were used to systematically investigate how biogeochemical conditions during precipitate synthesis may influence resulting bio-cementation and related material engineering behaviors. Aqueous solution chemistry was monitored in time to better understand the relationship between the kinetics of ureolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation, and resulting precipitates. Following all experiments, precipitates were evaluated using x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy to characterize mineralogy and morphology. Results obtained from these investigations are expected to help identify the primary chemical and biological factors during synthesis that may control bio-cementation material properties and
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1824647
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10162705
Journal Name:
GeoCongress 2020
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
83 to 95
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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