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This content will become publicly available on October 17, 2022

Title: Resisting Dune Erosion with Bio-cementation
Coastal dunes often present the first line of defense for the built environment during extreme wave surge and storm events. In order to protect inland infrastructure, dunes must resist erosion in the face of these incidents. Microbial induced carbonate precipitation (MICP), or more commonly bio-cementation, can be used to increase the critical shear strength of sand and mitigate erosion. To evaluate the performance of bio-cemented dunes, prototypical dunes consisting of clean poorly graded sand collected from the Oregon coast were constructed within the Large Wave Flume at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory at Oregon State University. The bio-cementation treatment was sprayed onto the surface of the unsaturated dune. The level of cementation was monitored using shear wave velocity measurements throughout the duration of the treatments. The treated and control dunes were subjected to 19 trials of approximately 300 waves each, with each trial increasing in water depth, wave height, and wave period. The performance of the dune was evaluated using lidar scans between each wave trial. The results indicate that the surface spraying treatment technique produced consistent levels of bio-cementation throughout the treated length of the dune and demonstrated significant resistance to erosion from the wave trails.
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1933350
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10188902
Journal Name:
10th International Conference on Scour and Erosion
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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