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Title: Space-efficient Query Evaluation over Probabilistic Event Streams
Real-time decision making in IoT applications relies upon space-efficient evaluation of queries over streaming data. To model the uncertainty in the classification of data being processed, we consider the model of probabilistic strings --- sequences of discrete probability distributions over a finite set of events, and initiate the study of space complexity of streaming computation for different classes of queries over such probabilistic strings. We first consider the problem of computing the probability that a word, sampled from the distribution defined by the probabilistic string read so far, is accepted by a given deterministic finite automaton. We show that this regular pattern matching problem can be solved using space that is only poly-logarithmic in the string length (and polynomial in the size of the DFA) if we are allowed a multiplicative approximation error. Then we show how to generalize this result to quantitative queries specified by additive cost register automata --- these are automata that map strings to numerical values using finite control and registers that get updated using linear transformations. Finally, we consider the case when updates in such an automaton involve tests, and in particular, when there is a counter variable that can be either incremented or decremented but more » decrements only apply when the counter value is non-zero. In this case, the desired answer depends on the probability distribution over the set of possible counter values that can range from 0 to n for a string of length n. Under a mild assumption, namely probabilities of the individual events are bounded away from 0 and 1, we show that there is an algorithm that can compute all n entries of this probability distribution vector to within additive 1/poly(n) error using space that is only Õ(n). In establishing these results, we introduce several new technical ideas that may prove useful for designing space-efficient algorithms for other query models over probabilistic strings. « less
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1763514
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10163320
Journal Name:
LICS'20: 35th Annual ACM/IEEE Symposium on Logic in Computer Science
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
74 to 87
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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